Lookup Warrants and Arrests in High Point, North Carolina. Results Include: Arrest Records, Police Report, Warrants, Mugshot, Type of Crime, Warrant Number, Bond Amount, Race, DOB, Address

High Point North Carolina Police Station Address: 1009 Leonard Ave, High Point, NC 27260, United States


3 hours ago
Sooooo @HighPointPolice asked you to stay at home because of the weather but your not sure what to do? Well we have a few ideas for you that are Free 99 #HPPD #WinterStorm2k18 #IfItKeepsSnowingIMayNeedARideHome #WhosMakingFrenchToastWithAllTheBreadEggsandMilk https://t.co/92GVfEJRvS

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3 hours ago
Traffic Alert: N Bound Bus 85 from Kivett Dr is currently shut down. @HighPointPolice @NCSHP are working 2 wrecks involving TTs. Please avoid the area and use 74 as alt route. If you do not have to drive please stay home. #HPPD #winterstorm2k18 #slowdown https://t.co/rAb3ietVvB

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4 hours ago
Traffic Alert: we are starting to see an increase in traffic accidents with overturned vehicles. Please SLOW DOWN, the speed limit is for perfect weather conditions. Take extra time to get home SAFE, trucks, 4 wheel, and all-wheel drive vehicles still slide off the road in snow! https://t.co/Hf6z4bKt8S

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High Point Police Department

The High Point Police Department Facebook Page is NOT monitored 24-hours a day. If you need immediate assistance, dial 911. To report a crime not in progress, call the non-emergency line at (336) 883-3224. To file a complaint or inquire about police procedures, please contact the Professional Standards Unit at (336) 887-7973. To apply for a position, contact our Recruiting Office at (336) 887-7930.
High Point Police Department

High Point Police Department11 hours ago

HIGH POINT POLICE, PUBLIX JOIN FORCES TO RAISE MONEY FOR SPECIAL OLYMPIC OF HIGH POINT

Your High Point Police will be at Publix Super Market on N Main St from noon to 2 pm on Jan. 20 with local Special Olympics athletes. The event is part of a partnership with Publix and law enforcement to raise awareness and funding for Special Olympics. Community members can make a donation to Special Olympics as they check out at the registers. Any donation amount given at the cash register earns a coupon pack (a $10 value) for various Proctor and Gamble items. The money raised provides an opportunity for those with intellectual disabilities to receive year-round training activities and funds the costs of their annual games. Nearly 40,000 Special Olympics athletes benefit from Special Olympics North Carolina.

We Hope to See You There!!!

http://sonc.net/2018-special-olympics-nc-publix-campaign-athlete-visits/

High Point Police Department

High Point Police Department3 days ago

NONPROFIT GIVES FELONS A SECOND CHANCE

BY NATALIE STEWART HIGH POINT ENTERPRISE
Jan 12, 2018

HIGH POINT — Mark Passante had been out of jail for about two years, struggling to make a better life for himself, when he was sent to 792 N. Main St.

In 2002, Passante’s wife died unexpectedly. He turned to drugs to fill the void and numb the pain.

“We were married for 13 years,” he said. “We were doing good and she had a heart attack. When someone leaves and you truly love them, there’s an emptiness. It’s not like anything else. I turned to drugs. I was doing all of it. Everything from pills to shooting up. Then I got stuck on crack.”

In 2007, Passante found himself in jail on a charge of felony assault by strangulation and misdemeanor assault on a female. He spent 192 days there.

“It was domestic violence, assault by strangulation,” said Passante, as tears welled in his eyes. “I fought her just like a guy. I’m sorry I did that. Drugs make you a different person.”

When Passante was released, he went to Caring Services, a local nonprofit that helps people recovering from substance abuse. That’s where he said he knew he had one of two choices to make.

“I knew I had to make a decision, and whatever decision I made I was going to have to face whatever was going to come down the highway,” he said. “I knew if I went one way I would be back in jail, and I don’t want to go there. So, I said, ‘I’ll go this way.’”

Two years later, Passante found himself at 792 N. Main St. at High Point Community Against Violence.

Over the past two decades, many people have sought out that same address in hopes of finding a better life than one of violence and jail. A group of concerned residents formed HPCAV in 1997 when the city was experiencing a spike in violence. The nonprofit offers convicted felons with violent histories a second chance. The offenders are given job skills training and some financial assistance when needed. They also are referred to other services that can help them in turning their lives around.

Passante credits HPCAV with helping him find a fresh start in life.

“It gave me permission to be a better person,” he said. “It taught me how to lock the evil up and throw it away. It showed me how to help others. I still have a hard time with myself. I could go out and pick up and use, rob somebody. But I don’t want to do that anymore. I want something out of life.”

In 2010, Passante started school at Guilford Technical Community College, where he learned building trades, like heating and air, electric and plumbing. And although it sometimes was a struggle, Passante said he got through it. He said he had stints where he was homeless, and in a tent studying with a flashlight until its batteries died.

“For a long time, I hid behind not being the most intelligent guy, but I can’t do that anymore,” he said. “I always thought I was less than, not worthy of, couldn’t get along, wasn’t smart enough, wasn’t good enough. I just wasn’t.”

Eight years after first walking through the doors at HPCAV. Passante still returns regularly to volunteer, and be an example for others who are first walking through those same doors.

Although Passante said life is still tough, it’s better now than it was before.

“What HPCAV has given me is a little self-respect and self-esteem,” he said. “Life is tough. I’m still scared, but life is a lot, a lot better. I don’t live in fear anymore. It’s still hard, but it’s better than before. People walk away from here with more knowledge, and it’s useful knowledge. It’s skills they didn’t have before they walked in. You can’t say you’re less than anymore because now, that’s a bunch of crap.”

http://www.hpenews.com/news/nonprofit-gives-felons-a-second-chance/article_1eec4d7a-f7a6-11e7-b201-773782ab0e2e.html

nstewart@hpenews.com | 336-888-3601 | @NatalieLStewart

High Point Police Department

High Point Police Department3 days ago

COMBATING VIOLENCE
Police Strategy Continues to focus on Intervention

BY NATALIE STEWART HIGH POINT ENTERPRISE
January 12, 2018

HIGH POINT — Over the past two decades, local law enforcement has warned more than 1,100 known violent people of the consequences they could face if they pick up another gun. The warnings are coupled with an offer of help from community volunteers.

But is the strategy to drive down violence by targeting specific people still working?

Twenty years ago, the High Point Police Department formed a Violent Crimes Task Force, which is made up of local, state and federal law enforcement. At the same time, a group of community members joined forces and formed High Point Community Against Violence. The nonprofit began working hand-in-hand with police.

The task force’s strategy to combat violence is based on criminal records, and police say records are a good indicator of the path a person is following.

“We can look back at patterns,” said Lt. Curtis Cheeks III. “History tells us when someone is involved with gangs, drug activity or in violent acts, then they’ll likely fall into one of two categories. They’ll end up incarcerated long term or they’ll be the victim of a serious violent crime.”

With its formation, the task force started calling in known violent people in hopes of stopping them from committing any more violent acts. Officials analyze people’s criminal records, and those who meet the criteria are called to sit before a dais of law enforcement officials, including from local police, state and federal prosecutors, the FBI, U.S. Marshals Service and the Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms and Explosives.

Before law enforcement delivers a stern warning, the offenders are encouraged by HPCAV volunteers, and offered help through the nonprofit. HPCAV offers job training to convicted felons with violent records. It also offers other assistance, from financial help to help getting food and other things they may need.

Notifications
Through the 1990s, the city averaged 11 killings per year. In 1997, when the task force was formed, there were 15 killings. Since 2009, the most killings the city had seen was seven in 2015 and 2016.

Last year, the number of homicides in the city hit a 43-year high when 21 people were killed. One of the killings was ruled justified self-defense when a suspect was killed during a home invasion, police said.

Police Chief Ken Shultz said five of 21 people killed in High Point in 2017 were notified by the task force during a call-in. A total of 1,176 people have been notified during a call-in over the past two decades.

“We’re using their pattern of behavior to look at what road they’re heading down and try to prevent that,” Cheeks said.

Of the 29 people charged in connection with last year’s homicides, one was notified during a call-in, Capt. Tim Ellenberger said. The other 28 suspects were not called in because they didn’t meet the criteria, he said.

“The criteria for the call-in is pretty strict,” he said. “That’s what gives the message legitimacy. If we stick tight to the criteria, then it’s transparent. Everyone meets the same criteria and it’s legitimate.”

People called in are on probation or parole, are convicted felons and have an arrest history involving guns.

Of the 29 suspects charged in connection with last year’s killings, 13 have criminal records, according to N.C. Department of Public Safety records. Their records include convictions on drug charges, larcenies or burglaries. More than half of the 29 suspects are under 25. The youngest person charged with murder last year was a 14-year-old boy.

Police also use custom notification letters to put people on notice. The letters are hand-delivered by a detective and HPCAV.

“There are a couple of reasons we’ll custom notify someone,” Ellenberger said. “If we can’t afford to wait until the next call-in to get in front of that person, or if they’re someone who may not meet the criteria for the call-in but their name keeps coming up in reports and around violent incidents.”

Shultz said two of the people who were killed last year had been custom notified. Of the suspects charged in connection with one of last year’s homicides, one was custom notified, Ellenberger said.

Over the past 20 years, 174 people have been notified by hand-delivered letters.

‘Was there something we missed?’

Police tout the strategy as being successful in lowering violent crimes in the city. In the 1990s, the city averaged 1,260 violent crimes per year. Over the past 10 years, the city has averaged 562 violent crimes per year. Although the number of killings in the city showed a stark increase last year, the number of total violent crimes remained static. There were 604 violent crimes reported last year. The number of violent crimes has nearly been cut in half from the mid-1990s to 2017, while the number of people living in High Point has increased. About 112,200 people live in the city today, compared to about 71,200 in the mid-1990s, according to data from the city’s planning department.

Ellenberger said regardless of the number of violent crimes, the department looks at its plan every year.

“We’re looking at it and asking ourselves, ‘Did we miss something?’” Ellenberger said. “Did we miss an opportunity to get in front of someone, or to deter someone? If there’s one person killed, and you’re the family or loved one of that person, it doesn’t matter how successful this is. We owe it to ourselves and to this community to look at every single case and ask ourselves, ‘Was there something we missed? Could this have been prevented? Did something fall through the cracks?’”

Ellenberger said police review their strategy regularly, and look at new ways to gather names of people for call-ins and customs notifications. Police also are looking at how they can better stop people from retaliating, which is what police said was the cause of many of last year’s shootings.

Ellenberger said when police investigate a shooting, they quickly work to figure out who the victim associates with in order to get in front of them before they try to retaliate.

“It obviously was a horrific year,” Shultz said. “We continue working on looking at what we can learn and where we can make an impact in the future. Over the next month or so, we’ll look and see if there’s an opportunity to refresh our message or reach out. We’re being proactive, and we’ll continue to do that.”

http://www.hpenews.com/news/police-strategy-continues-to-focus-on-intervention/article_33f5d35e-f7a5-11e7-bb1b-3f8027e8fe47.html

nstewart@hpenews.com | 336-888-3601 | @NatalieLStewart

High Point Police Department

High Point Police Department6 days ago

Join Your High Point Police Department for its first Police Ceremony of the New Year. On Friday, January 12, 2018 @ 3:00 pm at the City of High Point Council Chambers. See Flyer for more details.

High Point Police Department

High Point Police Department1 week ago

HIGH POINT POLICE, PUBLIX JOIN FORCES TO RAISE MONEY FOR SPECIAL OLYMPIC OF HIGH POINT

Your High Point Police will be at Publix Super Market on N Main St from noon to 2pm on Jan. 13 and again on Jan. 20 with local Special Olympics athletes. The event is part of a partnership with Publix and law enforcement to raise awareness and funding for Special Olympics. Community members can make a donation to Special Olympics as they check out at the registers. Any donation amount given at the cash register earns a coupon pack (a $10 value) for various Proctor and Gamble items. The money raised provides an opportunity for those with intellectual disabilities to receive year-round training activities and funds the costs of their annual games. Nearly 40,000 Special Olympics athletes benefit from Special Olympics North Carolina.

We Hope to See You There!!!

http://sonc.net/2018-special-olympics-nc-publix-campaign-athlete-visits/

High Point Police Department

High Point Police Department shared The City of High Point’s post.1 week ago